MOVIES AT THE MUSEUM OF THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY & BARNS OF ROSE HILL

First showings at the MSV/Second showings at BRH

Reception Hall, Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 901 Amherst St, Winchester, VA | Barns of Rose Hill, 95 Chalmers St., Berryville, VA

Doors open thirty minutes before showing at both locations | Come early to snack, drink & mingle;

Admission: $8 .  FREE to youth 12 & under

THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS

March 3 at 4:30 p.m./March 17 at 4 p.m.

Triplet boys are separated at birth, adopted by three different families, only to discover each other accidentally at the age of 19.  Their reunion in New York in 1980, catapulted the boys to international fame – but also led to revelation of an extraordinary secret with dramatic implications for our understanding of human nature.

“A riveting documentary that plays like a mystery novel” (Newsday)

Rated PG-13; 96 minutes.

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

SPECIAL EVENT

Waking Ned Devine

The Robinson auditorium of Handley Library, 100 W. Piccadilly St. at 2 p.m., Saturday, March 9 – free and open to the public

EATING ANIMALS

Friday evening, March 15 at 7 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Church of the Shenandoah Valley, 6380 Valley Pike, Stephens City, VA.

As part of Winchester’s annual Celtic Fest, the MLT, in collaboration with Old Town Winchester and Handley Regional Library, will screen the sly and very popular 1998 Irish comedy, Waking Ned Devine. What happens when the village has a winner in the lotto jackpot — but the winner is unable to collect? And how does a community come together to learn the importance of friendship and the true value of money?

The showing takes place in the Robinson auditorium of Handley Library, 100 W. Piccadilly St. at 2 p.m., Saturday, March 9 and is free and open to the public.

“Another one of those delightful village comedies that seem to spin out of the British isles annually” (Roger Ebert)

Based on the best-selling book by Jonathan Safran Foer and narrated and produced by Oscar winner Natalie Portman, Eating Animals explores the history of the factory farming system and its impact on our economy, health, and environment.

Eating Animals will be screened on Friday evening, March 15 at 7 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Church of the Shenandoah Valley, 6380 Valley Pike, Stephens City, VA. The film runs 95 minutes and is not rated.

“The message is clear…Care about where your meat comes from, because then you might eat less of it, feel better when you do eat it, and cause a little less suffering in the world” (Los Angeles Times)

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